Keisai Eisen – “Teamwork”

$250.00

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MLS2022081

Additional information

Artist

Eisen, Keisai

Date

1840s-1860s

Condition

(A) Very Fine Condition

Edition

Unknown

Movement

Ukiyo-e

Publisher

Unknown

Size

Kakuban (7"x8")

Subjects

Shunga (NSFW)

While we don’t have a title for this print, we’ve come to think of it as depicting “teamwork”… and the rose is a nice touch :)

Tentatively attributed to Keisai Eisen circa mid-1820s, it is a single image from a “broken” accordion style book (orihon) titled “Azuma hinagata” or “Models of the East”. Known as a warai-e, roughly translated as “laughing picture” these comical sex pictures enjoyed a great vogue during the late Edo and early Meiji periods.

Measures roughly 6.5″ squared.

The Woodblock Print

This woodblock print is in very fine condition. Good color, minimal wear, vertical crease where it was part of a book. A clean verso and full clean margins.

About the Artist

Keisai Eisen (渓斎 英泉, 1790–1848) was a renowned Japanese ukiyo-e artist who made significant contributions to the art form during the Edo period. Born in Edo (present-day Tokyo), Eisen initially trained as a kabuki actor before transitioning to the world of ukiyo-e. He studied under the influential artist Kikugawa Eizan, who played a crucial role in shaping Eisen’s artistic development (Marks, 2010).

One of Eisen’s notable influences was Kitagawa Utamaro, a prominent ukiyo-e artist. Eisen admired Utamaro’s elegant and sensual portrayals of women, which inspired his own works in the bijin-ga genre. Bijin-ga, or “pictures of beautiful women,” became a signature theme in Eisen’s art. He depicted courtesans, geishas, and women from different walks of life with grace and attention to detail (Nakano, 2017).

Eisen also delved into the world of shunga, a genre of erotic art. His shunga prints, known for their explicit and playful depictions of sexual encounters, showcased his skill in capturing intimate and sensual moments. Eisen’s shunga works often combined humor, wit, and delicate line work, contributing to the popularity of the genre during the Edo period (Marks, 2010).

In addition to bijin-ga and shunga, Eisen was highly skilled in creating surimono, which were privately commissioned prints. Surimono were typically smaller in size and featured intricate designs with various printing techniques, including embossing and metallic pigments. Eisen’s surimono prints demonstrated his meticulous attention to detail, refined compositions, and use of luxurious materials (Nakano, 2017).

While there is limited information about specific students who studied directly under Eisen, his artistic influence on subsequent generations of ukiyo-e artists is evident. His expressive portrayal of figures, innovative use of color, and ability to capture intimate scenes resonated with other printmakers. Notable artists like Utagawa Hiroshige and Utagawa Kunisada were influenced by Eisen’s style and incorporated elements of his techniques into their own works (Marks, 2010).

Eisen’s unique artistic style and contributions to bijin-ga, shunga, and surimono made him a celebrated ukiyo-e artist. His prints were highly sought after by collectors and patrons of the arts. Eisen’s ability to capture the essence of Edo society, his attention to detail, and his depiction of sensuality in his shunga prints all played a part in shaping his enduring legacy in the world of ukiyo-e (Nakano, 2017).

References:

  • Marks, A. (2010). Japanese Woodblock Prints: Artists, Publishers, and Masterworks: 1680-1900. Tuttle Publishing.
  • Nakano, K. (2017). The Floating World of Ukiyo-e: Shadows, Dreams, and Substance. Kawade Shobo Shinsha Publishers.