Toshi Yoshida – Winter, Sitting Under Snow-covered Leaves

Out of stock

Additional information

Artist

Yoshida, Toshi

Condition

(B) Fine Condition

Date

1960s-1970s

Movement

Shin-hanga

Publisher

Yoshida Family Studio

Size

Large Oban (11.5"x17")

Subjects

Birds / Beasts, Plants & Flowers

This oversized oban is Toshi Yoshida’s “Winter, Sitting Under Snow-covered Leaves” from his series “Birds of the Seasons”, a series of four large prints (image size of 10″x20″, 13.5″x21.5″) of seasonal views of birds and flowers by Toshi Yoshida, published in 1977 by Yoshida Family Studio, commissioned and issued by the Franklin Mint. Seasonal themes often occur in Japanese art and this is a large, vibrant and colorful example with birds rendered in delicate strokes, proof of Toshi Yoshida’s observation and artistic skills, and perhaps some of the most beautiful kacho-e on the market. Sealed and pencil signed by the artist.

It is strongly encouraged that you use the magnifying glass functionality and then zoom in to admire the incredible detail to the birds in these prints.

See available prints from this series.

The Woodblock Prints

This print is in good condition with strong colors, rich tones, and miniscule discolorations in the print. There is residue from the tape used in the original framing, but that is limited to the top and bottom edge of the verso and is not visible from the front. Toning to the paper and faint matburn, common to these prints from how they were originally framed. Some foxing present.

About the Artist

Toshi Yoshida (吉田 遠志, July 25, 1911 – July 1, 1995) was a Japanese artist known for his mastery of the traditional Japanese woodblock printmaking technique of moku-hanga. Born in Tokyo, Toshi was the son of the famous woodblock print artist Hiroshi Yoshida. He began studying art at an early age and quickly developed his skills as a printmaker.

Toshi’s work was characterized by its attention to detail and its use of vivid, bold colors. He often depicted natural landscapes and scenes of everyday life, and his prints were highly sought after by collectors around the world.

In addition to his printmaking, Toshi was also a skilled painter and illustrator. He worked on a number of book projects, including a series of children’s books that he both wrote and illustrated.

Toshi’s influence on Japanese art and culture can still be felt today. His work has been exhibited in museums and galleries around the world, including the National Museum of Modern Art in Tokyo and the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. His prints are highly prized by collectors and are considered to be some of the finest examples of modern Japanese printmaking.

Toshi also made significant contributions to the art of printmaking through his teaching and mentorship of young artists. He established a printmaking school in Tokyo and taught many aspiring printmakers the traditional techniques of moku-hanga.

Throughout his career, Toshi remained dedicated to the preservation and promotion of traditional Japanese art. He was honored with numerous awards and honors for his contributions to the art world, including the Order of the Rising Sun, one of Japan’s highest civilian honors.

Sources:

  • “Toshi Yoshida: A Retrospective” by Barry Till, Art Gallery of Greater Victoria (1999)
  • “Toshi Yoshida: The Complete Works” by Toshi Yoshida, Abe Publishing (2005)
  • “Toshi Yoshida: The Artist and His Work” by James Michener, Charles E. Tuttle Company (1968)