Additional information

Artist

Kuniyoshi, Utagawa

Condition

(A) Very Good Condition

Date

1910s-1930s

Movement

Ukiyo-e

Size

Oban (10"x15")

In stock

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Utagawa Kuniyoshi – Nichiren in the Snow at Tsukahara on Sado Island

$500.00

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Monk Nichiren making his way through the snow up a hillside during his exile on Sado island.

Description

Monk Nichiren making his way through the snow up a hillside during his exile on Sado island.

The Woodblock Print

This is most likely a Meiji-era recarving of the original from 1830; it is of the second state of the original design lacking the horizontal line that demarcates the horizon in the first state. We believe it to be a recarving based on the paper quality, as well as the coloring of the publisher information in the right margin (the original was in red and black whereas this print is only in black). The print is in very good condition with strong colors, registry lines, and no discoloration within the print. Only slight discoloration in the edges of the margins, which do happen to be fully intact. Residue of glue paper on the verso.

About the Artist

Utagawa Kuniyoshi was born into the Igusa family in Edo as the son of silk dyer. Little is known about his very early years; Kuniyoshi began his ukiyo-e career as a pupil of Shunei. At age 14 he was accepted to study the art of woodblock printing under Toyokuni I and would become one of his most successful students. In 1814 he left Toyokuni’s studio to pursue a career as an independent Japanese ukiyo-e artist. Initially he had little success, selling tatami mats in order to support himself. His fortunes changed in 1827 with his dramatic series "108 Heroes of the Suikoden". From that point on the public sought out his portrayals of famous samurai and legendary heroes. Kuniyoshi worked in all genres, producing some brilliant landscapes and charming bijin-ga (pictures of beautiful women). He died in the spring of 1861 from complications of a stroke.

Utagawa Kuniyoshi – Nichiren in the Snow at Tsukahara on Sado Island

Monk Nichiren making his way through the snow up a hillside during his exile on Sado island.

$500.00

In stock

Add to Wishlist
Add to Wishlist

Additional information

Artist

Kuniyoshi, Utagawa

Condition

(A) Very Good Condition

Date

1910s-1930s

Movement

Ukiyo-e

Size

Oban (10"x15")

Description

Monk Nichiren making his way through the snow up a hillside during his exile on Sado island.

The Woodblock Print

This is most likely a Meiji-era recarving of the original from 1830; it is of the second state of the original design lacking the horizontal line that demarcates the horizon in the first state. We believe it to be a recarving based on the paper quality, as well as the coloring of the publisher information in the right margin (the original was in red and black whereas this print is only in black). The print is in very good condition with strong colors, registry lines, and no discoloration within the print. Only slight discoloration in the edges of the margins, which do happen to be fully intact. Residue of glue paper on the verso.

About the Artist

Utagawa Kuniyoshi was born into the Igusa family in Edo as the son of silk dyer. Little is known about his very early years; Kuniyoshi began his ukiyo-e career as a pupil of Shunei. At age 14 he was accepted to study the art of woodblock printing under Toyokuni I and would become one of his most successful students. In 1814 he left Toyokuni’s studio to pursue a career as an independent Japanese ukiyo-e artist. Initially he had little success, selling tatami mats in order to support himself. His fortunes changed in 1827 with his dramatic series "108 Heroes of the Suikoden". From that point on the public sought out his portrayals of famous samurai and legendary heroes. Kuniyoshi worked in all genres, producing some brilliant landscapes and charming bijin-ga (pictures of beautiful women). He died in the spring of 1861 from complications of a stroke.

In stock

Add to Wishlist
Add to Wishlist