Additional information

Artist

Kunichika, Toyohara

Condition

(B) Good Condition

Date

1880s-1900s

Movement

Ukiyo-e

Subjects

Actor, Kabuki

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Toyohara Kunichika – Board game of the Flower Stage (Hanabutai atari sugoroku)

$350.00

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Special edition playbills were often published in the form of a gameboard highlighting scenes from Kabuki plays and the actors in their starring roles. Shown here is the central scene from a foldout playbill showing actors portraying a Buddhist monk and his vision of the guardian king Fudō and two attendants.

Description

Special edition playbills were often published in the form of a gameboard highlighting scenes from Kabuki plays and the actors in their starring roles. Shown here is the central scene from a foldout playbill showing actors portraying a Buddhist monk and his vision of the guardian king Fudō and two attendants.

The Woodblock

Published in 1883, this woodblock print is in fair to good condition. A cutout scene from a much larger foldout gameboard, backed. It is missing a section in the lower right quadrant and has creases from being folded (as a gameboard), but is redeemed in its vibrant color and intricate design. An overall captivating piece.

About the Artist

"Since I am tired of painting portraits of people of this world, I will paint portraits of the King of hell and the devils."

Born in 1835, Toyohara Kunichika grew up in the Kyobashi district of Edo in the midst of merchants and artisans. In 1848, at age 13, he was accepted as an apprentice into the studio of Utagawa Kunisada I (Toyokuni III 1786–1865). Kunichika's work stands in contrast to that of many of his contemporaries as he persistently held onto the traditional style and subject matter of the classic Japanese woodcut, unaffected by new Western forms of art. His love of Kabuki inspired him to depict actors in their various roles and varying facial expressions. His skillful use of color and ability to translate the actor's depth of emotion onto the page makes his work some of the most dramatic ever produced. Later on in his career, Kunichika turned primarily to the triptych format as the increased size gave him the space to fully portray the drama and action of the characters represented.

Kunichika was known as one of “The Three Greats of Meiji Ukiyo-e”, along with Yoshitoshi Tsukioka (1839-1892) and Kiyochika Kobayashi (1847-1915)

Toyohara Kunichika – Board game of the Flower Stage (Hanabutai atari sugoroku)

Special edition playbills were often published in the form of a gameboard highlighting scenes from Kabuki plays and the actors in their starring roles. Shown here is the central scene from a foldout playbill showing actors portraying a Buddhist monk and his vision of the guardian king Fudō and two attendants.

$350.00

In stock

Add to Wishlist
Add to Wishlist

Additional information

Artist

Kunichika, Toyohara

Condition

(B) Good Condition

Date

1880s-1900s

Movement

Ukiyo-e

Subjects

Actor, Kabuki

Description

Special edition playbills were often published in the form of a gameboard highlighting scenes from Kabuki plays and the actors in their starring roles. Shown here is the central scene from a foldout playbill showing actors portraying a Buddhist monk and his vision of the guardian king Fudō and two attendants.

The Woodblock

Published in 1883, this woodblock print is in fair to good condition. A cutout scene from a much larger foldout gameboard, backed. It is missing a section in the lower right quadrant and has creases from being folded (as a gameboard), but is redeemed in its vibrant color and intricate design. An overall captivating piece.

About the Artist

"Since I am tired of painting portraits of people of this world, I will paint portraits of the King of hell and the devils."

Born in 1835, Toyohara Kunichika grew up in the Kyobashi district of Edo in the midst of merchants and artisans. In 1848, at age 13, he was accepted as an apprentice into the studio of Utagawa Kunisada I (Toyokuni III 1786–1865). Kunichika's work stands in contrast to that of many of his contemporaries as he persistently held onto the traditional style and subject matter of the classic Japanese woodcut, unaffected by new Western forms of art. His love of Kabuki inspired him to depict actors in their various roles and varying facial expressions. His skillful use of color and ability to translate the actor's depth of emotion onto the page makes his work some of the most dramatic ever produced. Later on in his career, Kunichika turned primarily to the triptych format as the increased size gave him the space to fully portray the drama and action of the characters represented.

Kunichika was known as one of “The Three Greats of Meiji Ukiyo-e”, along with Yoshitoshi Tsukioka (1839-1892) and Kiyochika Kobayashi (1847-1915)

In stock

Add to Wishlist
Add to Wishlist